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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Fri, Jul 05th, 2002 @ 17:01 ( . )

Well, being as I don't much like taking stuff to other people to do, I elected to give John Howell's suggestion about using Modge Podge (or Mod Podge, as I found at Wal-Mart) a try.

It seems to me the biggest trick about making it not look like paper is making the graphic look attractive. I spent hours today trying to get something suitable before finally giving up and just moving forward with the concession.

So far, I've discovered that when this stuff dries just a little (like 90 seconds) on the metal with your paper on it, you won't move it. fageddaboudit. You have about 15 seconds where you can move it.

I managed to get the paper on mostly straight and then a bit later applied one coat over the top, which is now drying.

At this stage, it still looks like paper, but it is at least drying clear, which is a relief.

I wonder if using something like a roller as John did won't be important. If this has a smooth texture, I expect it will look like... well... paper. :)

Updates to follow as the coats go down. Anyone care to describe a 'wet sanding' procedure?

-CH

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Paul Ruby (registered user: 6266 posts )
Date: Fri, Jul 05th, 2002 @ 17:29 ( . )

Chris,

I bought some craft paper with a gold finsh. It's bright gold, like gold leaf looking stiff. It runs through may laser printer fine. This might be a good choice to try with mo-po.

- Paul

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Fri, Jul 05th, 2002 @ 20:01 ( . )

On 07/05/2002 @ 17:29, Paul Ruby wrote :
:Chris,
:
: I bought some craft paper with a gold finsh. It's bright gold, like gold leaf looking stiff. It runs through may laser printer fine. This might be a good choice to try with mo-po.
:
: - Paul
--

thats interesting. Craft store, I assume? I didn't see any at wal-ly world.


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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Paul Ruby (registered user: 6266 posts )
Date: Fri, Jul 05th, 2002 @ 20:20 ( . )

Yep. Craft store. It looks really good and would be great behind some plexi.

- Paul

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Mark S (guest: search)
Date: Sat, Jul 06th, 2002 @ 02:24 ( . )

THis is what I have done, and it does look pretty good. Pictures pretty soon. the paper I got is more like poster paper, barely flexible enough to go through my desk jet. Not all gold coated paper accepts ink jet printing, as I discovered....

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Sat, Jul 06th, 2002 @ 22:04 ( . )

On 07/05/2002 @ 20:20, Paul Ruby wrote :
:Yep. Craft store. It looks really good and would be great behind some plexi.
:
: - Paul
--

I picked up some today. Silver on one side, gold on the other side. $1 for a sheet that would make half a dozen plates.

I ran some through the laser printer and it wasn't quite as good as I'd hoped, but not bad.

Mod Podge didn't hold it to the chassis very well, however. Plus the Mod Podge didn't look good over it either. :) heh... guess I was just going too far with it. I peeled it off and sanded the chassis and now I'm trying another attempt. I've got some clear spray finish that didn't seem to bother the toner, so I may give that a spin. Plexi would be better, although I'm very concerned about how all this stuff will stand up to being drilled!

My previous Mod Podge attempt with regular paper stuck like concrete. I tried to apply a lite mist of spray paint to make it look less like paper and the first mist was fine. The second mist was too dark and clobbered the image. oops. I'm gonna have to take the belt sander to that one.

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Sat, Jul 06th, 2002 @ 22:05 ( . )

One other amusing point... My laser wouldn't feed this board past the delivery assembly, so I had to defeat the rear door interlock and just collect the result at the fuser. worked fine, but kinda funny. (Laserjet 5si)

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Sat, Jul 06th, 2002 @ 22:50 ( . )

On 07/06/2002 @ 22:04, Chris Hurley wrote :
: Mod Podge didn't hold it to the chassis very well, however. Plus the Mod Podge didn't look good over it either. :) heh... guess I was just going too far with it. I peeled it off and sanded the chassis and now I'm trying another attempt. I've got some clear spray finish that didn't seem to bother the toner, so I may give that a spin. Plexi would be better, although I'm very concerned about how all this stuff will stand up to being drilled!

well, clear lacquer soaks into the paper. hmmm...


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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Mon, Jul 08th, 2002 @ 10:09 ( . )

On 07/06/2002 @ 22:04, Chris Hurley wrote :

: I picked up some today. Silver on one side, gold on the other side. $1 for a sheet that would make half a dozen plates.
--

This turned out pretty good. I applied it to the chassis with Mod Podge after sanding the chassis. A very generous coating of MP is required and I'm still working on a technique to help with bubbles.

When the MP is dry, it is like concrete. You can dig parts of the label off with a lot of effort, UNLESS it gets wet. I was able to soak a chassis in the sink and the entire mess came off fairly easily.

Turns out that spraying it with a clear finish also worked pretty well. It soaks into the paper a bit, but the next morning it looked pretty convincing.


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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:James Peters (registered user: 1685 posts )
Date: Mon, Jul 08th, 2002 @ 21:01 ( . )

"Unless it gets wet"--that's what concerns me about using it. Perhaps use the mod podge, and when it's dry clear-coat it. That should seal it.

For the effort, I can't imagine myself trying it again...I'm far too lazy and would rather get faceplates made. :^)

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Mon, Jul 08th, 2002 @ 21:39 ( . )

On 07/08/2002 @ 21:01, James Peters wrote :
:"Unless it gets wet"--that's what concerns me about using it. Perhaps use the mod podge, and when it's dry clear-coat it. That should seal it.
:

no no... not wet. SOAKED for a while. :)

: For the effort, I can't imagine myself trying it again...I'm far too lazy and would rather get faceplates made. :^)

its a lot of effort for me to get them made. :) Its not really bad after getting the hang of it. Of course, I'm still working with it.

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Al Nelson (guest: search)
Date: Fri, Jul 05th, 2002 @ 22:02 ( . )

Wow, wet sanding to an 'optical' finish can be challenging. On lacquer guitar finishes, I use a wooden sanding block a little bigger than a 9v batery with a thin layer of hard felt on the bottom. For the wetting agent, I like to use inexpensive concentrated liquid car wash, but most plain liquid soaps (no tricky additives) will work when diluted to dishwater consistency.

After working the surface through 320 and 400 dry to flatten it, I go through grits 600, 800, 1200 and 2000 wet sanding and then do final polishing on a cotton buff. I bet you could start at 1200 or 1500 and go through 2000 or 2500.

What has worked before is: cut the paper to size with a utility knife - bending and tearing makes a ridge that will scratch. Then soak the paper in the wetting solution for a few minutes. Wrap it tightly on the block and sand as flat as possible with light pressure. You will feel "suction" pulling the block down to the surface and see a film of foam/bubbles if you are doing it right. After a few seconds, dip the block into the solution to keep it wet. Change paper when the grit is gone or becomes clogged. With each smaller grit, sand in a different direction so you can see that you have removed all of the scratches from the previous grit. Periodically, wipe with a soft cloth and check the surface reflections. Your reflection will go from fuzzy to mirror sharp as you go through the grits. After all of that, polish with a automotive clear-coat swirl remover.

Note - Stem Mac sells the micromesh papers used to sand scratches out of airliner windows.

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:John Howell (guest: search)
Date: Tue, Jul 09th, 2002 @ 10:05 ( . )

First apply the paper to the Chassis with MO-Po. Then apply 4-6 coats over the top at 12 hour intervals. Then you are ready to do the final finish.
When wet sanding, use a 220 then a 600 grit paper useing lots of water. It will come off looking milky. When properly dry, a little water won't damage it. If it turns a little white, leave it in the sun. If you want a matt finish, 600 grit it fine to leave as is. If you want a high gloss, put clear laquer over the top. It will not penetrate the Mo-Po.

Chris, the first plate is tiresome, but once you have the template the next one is a breeze. I use Visio and create groups for the Volume knobs etc. I can put one together within 1/2 hour or modify one in less.

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'A first try with Mod Podge'
Author:Chris Hurley (moderator: 7785 posts )
Date: Tue, Jul 09th, 2002 @ 11:57 ( . )

On 07/09/2002 @ 10:05, John Howell wrote :
: Chris, the first plate is tiresome, but once you have the template the next one is a breeze. I use Visio and create groups for the Volume knobs etc. I can put one together within 1/2 hour or modify one in less.
--

Yeah, it will be a breeze now...

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